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APA Community Arts & Film Festival Schedule Day 6
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5/14/2011
When: 5/14/2011
1:00 PM
Where: Board Room
9800 Town Park Dr.
Houston, Chinese Community Center  77036
Contact: Debbie Chen
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Saturday, May 14, 2011 1pm to 5:30pm
SEPARATE LIVES, BROKEN DREAMS by Jennie F. Lew | 1pm
SILENT SACRIFICES: VOICES OF THE FILIPINO AMERICAN FAMILY by Patricia Heras | 2pm
TALKING BACK TO YOUR TELEVISION: VIDEO ART & ACTIVISM Comp.by Valerie Soe | 2:30pm
THE HUMBERVILLE POETRY SLAM by Emily Chang, Dan Delorenzo | 3:35pm
STOLEN GROUND, by Lee Mun Wah, Lindsey Jang | 4pm 
THE COLOR OF FEAR by Lee Mun Wah, Lindsey Jang | 4:45pm


Saturday, May 14, 2011 1pm to 5:30pm
SEPARATE LIVES, BROKEN DREAMS by Jennie F. Lew | 47 min
This documentary gives an in-depth look at the impact of the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 and the effect that it continues to have on generations of Chinese and Chinese Americans. This law was the first exclusion policy officially adopted by the United States government, one of the results of the decades long scapegoating endured by Chinese workers caught in the crossfire of the lethal turn-of-the-century labor political powerplay. Personal stories as well as chilling revelations about INS (Immigration and Naturalization Service) procedures give a frame of reference to the archived histories of official documents and images, shedding light on the toll of institutionalized discrimination and racism that remains a century later.


SILENT SACRIFICES: VOICES OF THE FILIPINO AMERICAN FAMILY by Patricia Heras | 25 min
An insightful study of Filipino American family dynamics and psychologies, SILENT SACRIFICES delves into the cultural conflicts Filipino immigrants and their American-born children encounter on a daily basis. Frank discussions between teens, young adults and their parents reveal how issues of ethnic identity and opposing Filipino and American values contribute to youths bouts with depression, parenting difficulties and inter-generational misunderstandings. Intent on breaking the silence that allows dysfunctions to develop, the documentary offers an invaluable starting point for enhancing family communication within one of the countrys fastest growing demographics. SILENT SACRIFICES has prompted Filipino American parents and their teenage children to talk, many for the first time, about the prevalence of suicidal thoughts and attempts among the communitys youngsters.


TALKING BACK TO YOUR TELEVISION: VIDEO ART & ACTIVISM Comp.by Valerie Soe | 64 min
This compilation of Valerie Soes early experimental works (1986-1992) confronts the myths of Asian stereotypes head-on through images, personal stories and film clips.


 ALL ORIENTALS LOOK THE SAME 1986 | 1:30 min
This short video effectively debunks a racial myth, provoking the viewer to confront stereotyping and prejudices about Asians and Pacific Islanders.


Black Sheep 1990 | 6 min
Utilizing short vignettes, Soe recounts the story of her black sheep uncle to explore the implications of difference within and without marginalized culture.


New Year 1987 | 23 min
This videotape uses hand-drawn illustrations and found footage to explore the conflicts of a child caught between her Chinese American background and the stereotypes and expectations created by mainstream American film and television images. 


Picturing Oriental Girls: a [Re] Educational Videotape 1992 | 11 min
Clips from more than 25 Hollywood films and television programs, layered with voice-over and written words, examine the orientalism and exoticism prevalent in media images of Asian American women. 
Golden Gate Award, Best Bay Area Short Video, San Francisco International Film Festival


Walking the Mountain 1992 | 2:00 min
A memorial to the filmmakers young aunt and relatives.


Mixed Blood 1992 | 20 min
Takes a personal view of interracial relationships between Asian Americans and non-Asian Americans. Soe skillfully combines interviews with couples, text and clips from scientific films and classic miscegenation dramas to explore the complexities of intimate emotional and sexual choices. She wonders whether such choices have public and political implications.


THE HUMBERVILLE POETRY SLAM by Emily Chang, Dan Delorenzo | 17 min
The Humberville Poetry Slam, a comedic mockumentary, reveals how poetry fever hits even small towners. The film focuses on a small towns efforts to build a team for the National Poetry Slam. When Liberty Fu, an experienced poet, sets his sights on victory at Nationals, he decides to organize a local slam to find four poets who will help him represent the town and capture the title of Slam Champions. What he finds is an oddball cast of Humberville locals more than willing to unleash their poetic talents on stage. It seems all of Libertys plans are coming together&until one of Libertys secret weapons on his team drops out. He soon finds himself faced with the possibilities of not fulfilling his dream to be the poet star that he thinks he is. Winner of the Gold Coast Award 2009


STOLEN GROUND, by Lee Mun Wah, Lindsey Jang | 1993 | 44 min
Stolen Ground is a strikingly visceral documentary that follows the dinner conversation of six menChinese, Filipino and Japanese Americanswho share their personal experiences and thoughts on how racism, cultural ignorance and homophobia have affected and shaped their lives. Stolen Ground, puts a human face on the lingering effects of racism and gives a rare view of Asian-American men directly and openly addressing racism's impacts. Six American-born Asian-American men meet over dinner and share their experiences and perspectives of racism and what it has taken from their generation. Through their dinner dialogue, and their reflections afterwards, a seldom seen portrait of the so-called "model minority's" pain and anguish is revealed.


THE COLOR OF FEAR by Lee Mun Wah, Lindsey Jang | 1994 | 44 min
This is the 2nd film by Lee Mun Wah and involves the pain and anguish that racism has caused in the lives of North American men of Asian, European, Latino and African descent. Out of their confrontations and struggles to understand and trust each other emerges an emotional and insightful portrayal into the type of dialogue most of us fear but hope will happen sometime in our lifetime.


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